Almonds: Why they are not only good for your veins, but your entire body.

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Almonds are one of the most popular foods in the world. Many cultures use them in a multitude of dishes, and many of us enjoy them as a healthy snack. Almonds contain essential nutrients such as manganese, vitamin E, magnesium, zinc, calcium, tryptophan (essential amino acid), iron, copper, vitamin B2 and phosphorus. The are rich in monounsaturated fat, which is necessary for human body function- they have also been shown to help lower LDL cholesterol by as much as 9.4 percent.

 

So, why are they good for your veins?

 

Almonds have been known to reduce the risk of heart diseases, and the vitamin E in almonds is a fat-soluble antioxidant, making it good for the skin and overall immune system. Magnesium in almonds is great for vein and artery health. This is essential to help preventing varicose and spider veins. The calcium and phosphorus promote healthy blood circulation throughout the body. Having healthy blood circulation throughout the body drastically reduces your chances of developing varicose veins. Another benefit of almonds is that they help facilitate food through the colon- this helps relieve constipation, which will help lessen the pressure on the venous system, reducing the risk of varicose veins. Overall, almonds are incredibly healthy for you!

 

One easy way to incorporate almonds into your diet is to substitute almond milk for dairy milk.

 

Here is a recipe for homemade raw almond milk:

 

Ingredients:

 

1-cup raw almonds

Water for soaking nuts

3 cups water

2 dates (optional)

½ tsp. vanilla (optional)

 

Preparation:

 

Soak the almonds overnight or for at least 6 hours.

 

Drain the water from the almonds and discard. Blend the 3 cups of water, almonds and dates until well blended and almost smooth.

 

Strain the blended almond mixture using cheesecloth or other strainer.

 

Homemade raw almond milk will keep will in the refrigerator for three or four days.

 

 

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Filed under Uncategorized, Vascular Health

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