Monthly Archives: September 2015

What To Look For When Choosing a Vein Specialist

CiWU7eBR

Varicose veins:  They can be panful, ugly and lead to even more troublesome ailments such as cramping, restless legs, ulcers and blood clots.

Varicose veins occur when tiny valves regulating the flow of blood in leg veins are either damaged or missing. This causes the blood to slow and pool, and veins become enlarged. For most, varicose veins will not go away on their own, and medical treatments often provide relief.

However, it is imperative to choose a vein specialist who has the experience and is well versed in the latest technology to treat veins. Since lasers have been introduced as a vein treatment, other medical professionals have been offering vein treatment services. It is important to note that you may not get the comprehensive results you want from someone who isn’t board certified in treatment.

Both Dr. Robert Merchant and Dr. John Daake of the Reno Vein Clinic are both board certified the American Board of Phlebology, and are Vascular Surgeons who are dedicated solely to the treatment and correction of vein disorders.

Vein specialists, like Dr. Merchant and Dr. Daake at the Reno Vein Clinic can identify and treat varicose veins and other conditions, such as spider veins. They can also discuss a variety of treatment options and assess your risk for more dangerous and painful vein problems, such as blood clots or ulcers.

In addition to laser therapy, a vein specialist may recommend treatments and procedures such as an ultrasounds and sclerotherapy. Medical technology and understanding of vein disorders continues to progress. A board certified vein specialist is most likely to be up to date on the latest options.

Women are at greatest risk for developing varicose veins, but men get them, as well. Heredity, age and pregnancy also contribute to the development of varicose veins. Varicose veins may go away after pregnancy but, in other cases, they probably will not get better on their own.

To find a qualified vein specialist near you, these websites are a good place to start:

In addition to looking online for a qualified vein specialist, you can interview local specialists, ask a doctor for references, ask friends who have been treated for varicose veins or get a recommendation from your primary physician.

 

(Post adapted Via)

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Spider Veins, Treatment Options, Varicose Veins, Vascular Health

Mornings On Fox Segment: Varicose veins and your health

Dr. Robert Merchant, Vascular Surgeon at the Reno Vein Clinic, stopped by Mornings on Fox 11 to talk  about how problematic veins can be.

Varicose veins can be extremely painful and detrimental to a person’s overall health, but Dr. Merchant let us in on which new treatments are out there that can really help improve your health.

WATCH this clip to learn more

Screen Shot 2015-09-15 at 4.59.38 PM

http://www.foxreno.com/news/features/mornings-on-fox-11/stories/varicose-veins-your-health-2488.shtml#.VfhxcmTBwXA

Leave a comment

Filed under Varicose Veins, Vascular Health

The Grandma Disease that Strikes Young Men

We found this informative article from Mens Health.com and think it touches on some important aspects of vein health… especially for men. 

 

If you’re like most guys, you figure that varicose veins are:

a) a woman’s problem
b) a punch line that includes “compression hose”

c) not a big deal.

Think again.

As many as 56 percent of men suffer from these ballooned veins, according to British research.

And varicose veins are not just a cosmetic concern—they can lead to discoloration, bleeding, skin ulcers, and a “heavy leg” sensation that may hinder daily activity.

The problem involves the veins in the lower extremities. When you are in an erect position, your blood pools in these veins, expanding the vein walls which over time stop returning to their previous, more taut condition. According to French researchers, people with a particular genetic variation have markedly weaker veins, and have almost twice the risk for developing varicose veins.

“When the walls are weaker, it allows the veins to expand and eventually the valves [that regulate blood flow in the vein] don’t meet, which allows blood to reflux and flow in the opposite direction,” says Lowell Kabnick, M.D., director of the New York University Vein Center.

When that happens, the person develops the bulged, gnarly look of varicose veins—causing symptoms that include throbbing, swelling, and decreased mobility.

How can you avoid varicose veins. Take these precautions:

  • Exercise: This is the easiest way to maintain healthy venous structure and keep your vein walls strong. It’s important to involve your calves, which play a crucial role in maintaining blood flow from your legs back to the heart.
  • Reduce standing or sitting pressure: Sitting, which has been catching a lot of blame lately, takes another hit here. Why? Blood naturally pools in your legs when you’re not moving, and sitting for long periods exaggerates the problem. Your solution: simply tap a foot, raise your legs, or take a walk. If you’re standing still, sway from side to side if possible. Beyond that, try to raise your legs or lie horizontally twice a day for 15 minutes to remove all pressure on your veins.
  • Compression hose: Dr. Kabnick recommends everyone wear knee-length compression stockings—even if they don’t have signs of varicose veins. Compression leggings’ tension pushes the blood up from the ankle (the greatest pressure point), and redistributes it more evenly up the leg. If you don’t need prescription-grade strength, aim for hose with 10 to 30 millimeters of mercury (measurement of pressure).
  • Watch your diet: Stay away from foods high in sodium (especially restaurant, frozen, and packaged foods) since salt leads to fluid retention.

So, say you already have pain from raised bluish/brown veins. The good news is treatment of varicose veins has come a long way from the medieval-sounding “stripping” procedures of the not-so-distant past.

Today, doctors use lasers to remove and seal shut varicose veins. It’s a quick, noninvasive, outpatient surgery—and pain-free, too. For minor cases, a doctor might suggest sclerotherapy, a chemical injection that destroys the damaged vein.

“Going to the dentist is worse than removing varicose veins,” says Ronald Sprofera, of Jersey City, N.J. His surgery, performed by Dr. Kabnick, was over in 30 minutes. He never so much as flinched.

“I waited 10 years before I did anything,” said Sprofera, who had seen his mother suffer with varicose veins and the ensuing treatment years ago. “I shouldn’t have waited so long.”

 

Article via

Leave a comment

Filed under Spider Veins, Treatment Options