Category Archives: Varicose Veins

Jobs With a High Risk of Varicose Veins

One of the biggest risk factors to developing varicose veins is prolonged standing or sitting. Certain occupations that require people to sit or stand a lot can be bad for the health of your veins. We’ve compiled a list of professions that feature a high risk of developing varicose veins:

  1. Nurses

In terms of jobs that require long periods of standing, nursing is right near the top. Whether it’s taking vitals, interviewing patients, checking up on patients, or assisting doctors during surgery, nurses spend the majority of the day on their feet. We recommend that nurses wear compression stockings to help prevent varicose veins and their symptoms.

  1. Working in an Office

In general, office workers sit uninterrupted at their desks for much of the day. In addition to being an unhealthy way to work (humans weren’t designed to sit all day), a sedentary desk job can be a contributing cause of varicose veins. When you frequently sit for extended periods, the muscles in your legs that normally help pump blood aren’t used very much. As a result, blood could flow backwards in leg veins and pool, causing varicose veins.

  1. Working in a Factory

If you’ve ever worked in a factory or an assembly line, then you know how much time these workers spend on their feet every day. If you haven’t, let’s just say it’s a lot. And hour after hour on your feet, sometimes in one place, can be one of the bigger causes of varicose veins.

  1. Cashiers

When we think about jobs that require a lot of standing in one place for hours on end, we immediately think about cashiers and about how the required standing of the profession can be one of the causes of varicose veins.

From retail cashiers at big-box stores to cashiers at grocery stores, working the register for long periods of time can take its toll on your legs and veins.

  1. Hairstylists

Even though you get to sit in a comfy chair while you get your hair cut, hairstylists don’t. Instead, they typically stand on a hard floor all day, which can be what causes varicose veins.

Do you or someone you know have a job like these that requires prolonged sitting and standing? If so, consider seeing a vein specialist to ensure your vein health is not at risk.




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Varicose Veins and Itching.

Itching legs as a result of varicose veins can actually be a predictor of future vein problems if left untreated. We know varicose veins are associated with the accumulation of old blood in the damaged vessels.  Unless the legs are elevated, the blood does not return back to the heart readily from them.  Waste products like carbon dioxide, lactic acid, etc. can accumulate and the skin drained by these veins will have an increased concentration of waste products. This causes our skin to become drier and induces itching.

Over time this can produce varicose eczema, which causes increased healing times if injured and can lead to ulcers. Itching legs can indicate that it is definitely time to treat the varicose veins before the skin deteriorates into more severe problems.

If you have itching legs as a result of problematic veins, contact Reno Vein Specialists, Dr. Robert Merchant and Dr. John Daake at the Reno Vein Clinic (775) 329-3100.

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All About Compression Stockings

At Reno Vein Clinic, we receive a number of questions pertaining to compression stockings and how they work. We’ve rounded up some of the most common questions pertaining to compression stockings so you can have a better idea of what they are and how they help relive pain, swelling and increase circulation!

What Are Compression Stockings And Why Are They Useful?

Compression hosiery has been used to treat venous disorders since 1848, when William Brown patented the first elastic compression stocking. Since then, the use of even lightweight graduated compression hosiery has been widely proven to improve symptoms of discomfort, swelling, fatigue and aching.

Compression stockings put helpful pressure on your veins. Graduated stockings tighten the most at the ankle, and gradually deliver less tension as it stretches over the knee and towards the thigh. The result becomes the forcing of blood along its natural course despite the damage to the veins.

Tips on Buying and Using Compression Stockings

You don’t need a prescription to buy compression stockings. You can buy them online, from Reno Vein Clinic, at a medical supply store or at a full service pharmacy. Compression stockings will often range in price from about $50 to $100, depending on the size and style. Unless told otherwise by your doctor, you should not wear them when sleeping.If you plan on wearing them every day, get two pairs. This way, you can wear one while washing and drying the other.

To keep the elasticity, you need to wash them in warm water with a gentle detergent and let them dry flat. This means that if you remove your stockings, you need to wash and let them dry before using them again. This is where it comes in handy to have two pairs. Most stocking will last 3 to 4 months before losing their initial strength.

How to Choose Your Compression Stocking

  1. The length of your stocking

Two main lengths are available: knee and thigh highs. A knee-length gradient compression stocking is generally recommended for most cases, but if you have varicose veins or swelling above your knee, thigh high is recommended.

  1. The compression level

The standard compression levels in the USA are divided into three classes:
Class 1: 15-20 mmHg
Class 2: 20-30 mmHg
Class 3: 30-40 mmHg

Compression stocking between 15 and 20 mmHg effectively relieve the symptoms of venous insufficiency, prevent edema (swelling) and are well-tolerated by most people.

When and How to Apply Compression Stockings

Stockings should be applied before swelling builds in the legs. The ideal time is before going out of bed in the morning. If you take a shower, you should put them on right after drying yourself up.

A little trick to make the process of applying my stocking easier is to lie on your back with my legs in the air. This allows the blood to leave the legs which slightly reduces the size.

For more information on compression stockings and to see if they are a good idea for you, contact Reno Vein Clinic (775) 329-3100

(Adapted via)


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Car Travel and DVT

For those who love to get out on the open highway and drive, it’s important to know that lengthy travel time in cars increase the risk for developing a blood clot or Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). DVT can occur when the legs are constricted resulting in clots forming in veins in the lower leg. Within hours of forming, these clots are liable to fragment and travel around the body. They can lodge in the lung, heart or brain with potentially fatal results.

It’s been noted that any mode of travel lasting three hours or more can triple the chances of DVT to those who are susceptible. People most at risk include individuals who have recently had surgery, cancer or heart disease, those with a blood condition or history of thrombosis, or women who are pregnant or on hormone replacement therapy.

To reduce the risk of DVT during car travel, Dr. Robert Merchant of the Reno Vein Clinic suggests that both drivers and passengers take a break to stretch their legs at least every two hours, wear comfortable and unrestrictive clothing, drink plenty of water and consider compression stockings if necessary.

“Sometimes, driving can pose a larger threat than flying because passengers aren’t’ necessarily forced to get up and move, in comparison to having to walk through an airport to hop on a connecting flight” remarks Dr. Merchant.

For more information about preventing yourself from DVT and problematic vein issues, contact the Reno Vein Clinic (775) 329-3100.


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Circulation Boosting Exercises

Circulation is extremely important in our overall health, especially our veins. When circulation is reduced, ailments like varicose veins, kidney disease and even stroke may occur. Exercise plays a key role in improving blood circulation; we’ve rounded up some general tips to keep in mind when staying active that will benefit your health and your circulation too!

Raise Your Heart Rate

Any type of exercise that increases heart rate improves circulation. When the heart muscle contracts at a higher rate, the increased volume of blood moves more rapidly through the arteries and veins of the body, boosting circulation. You may know these exercises as cardio activities, and they are a vital part of improving your circulation. Daily activities such as walking or riding a bicycle strengthen and enlarge the heart muscle, improving the pumping efficiency. Increased circulation does not require extreme exercise, but can be achieved through daily exercises. If you want to incorporate more cardio exercise into your day, consider taking up running, swimming, kickboxing, skipping rope, and skiing. These are just a few effective options.

Pump Your Blood With Resistance

Both aerobic and anaerobic exercise improve circulation, but studies have shown that anaerobic or resistance exercise shows a greater increase in circulation. In a study funded by the National Strength and Conditioning Association, researchers studied 10 healthy, active men during both aerobic and resistance exercises. They determined that the resistance exercise increased blood flow to limbs more than aerobic exercise.

Amp Up Resistance Training

Resistance exercises may include lifting weights, sit-ups, pushups and chin-ups. Resistance training stimulates muscle growth and strength, improving blood flow to the arms and legs. Your circulation improves through consistent resistance training, making it an important component of a workout. To see increased circulation, incorporate resistance training into your workouts. Incorporate a variety of weight training exercises such as bench presses, squats, lunges, leg curls, overhead presses, and oblique twists. These exercises can be done by themselves or as part of your overall workout.

Building A Healthy Body For Life

Maintaining proper blood circulation should be a priority for all people. Regardless of your age or physical abilities, regular exercise to promote circulation has beneficial effects. Improving and maintaining blood circulation builds a strong heart muscle and also improves the efficiency of your body, ensuring that both the arms and legs receive oxygen and other vital nutrients.


Adapted (Via)



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Aging and Veins

Aging is inevitable and unfortunately, it’s also a common cause of varicose veins… in fact, varicose veins affect many as one out of every two people over the age of 50.

Here’s why:

As we age, all the blood vessels in the body tend to become less flexible and less elastic. This means that your veins could expand, but not necessarily return to their natural shape. This expansion can cause the veins to become damaged or not close properly, which then results in abnormal backward flow through the open valves.

This is more commonly known as venous reflux, which causes blood to collect, leaving veins expanded and resulting into those unwanted varicose and spider veins. If untreated, these varicose and spider veins can lead to swelling, leg ulcers and changes in the skin surrounding the lower leg and ankle.

Luckily there are minimally invasive treatments available to help treat and prevent problematic varicose veins.

Dr. Robert Merchant and Dr. John Daake of the Reno Vein Clinic can provide a consolation to determine the best treatment for you.

Visit or call 329-3100.


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Ask Dr. Merchant: Why do varicose veins and spider veins usually appear in the legs?

Q: Why do varicose veins and spider veins usually appear in the legs?

Dr. Merchant

A: “The force of gravity, the pressure of body weight, and the task of carrying blood from the bottom of the body up to the heart make legs the primary location for varicose and spider veins. Compared with other veins in the body, leg veins have the toughest job of carrying blood back to the heart. They endure the most pressure. This pressure can be stronger than the veins’ one-way valves”- Dr. Merchant




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