Tag Archives: Reno

Aging and Veins

Aging is inevitable and unfortunately, it’s also a common cause of varicose veins… in fact, varicose veins affect many as one out of every two people over the age of 50.

Here’s why:

As we age, all the blood vessels in the body tend to become less flexible and less elastic. This means that your veins could expand, but not necessarily return to their natural shape. This expansion can cause the veins to become damaged or not close properly, which then results in abnormal backward flow through the open valves.

This is more commonly known as venous reflux, which causes blood to collect, leaving veins expanded and resulting into those unwanted varicose and spider veins. If untreated, these varicose and spider veins can lead to swelling, leg ulcers and changes in the skin surrounding the lower leg and ankle.

Luckily there are minimally invasive treatments available to help treat and prevent problematic varicose veins.

Dr. Robert Merchant and Dr. John Daake of the Reno Vein Clinic can provide a consolation to determine the best treatment for you.

Visit www.renoveinclinic.com or call 329-3100.

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Filed under Spider Veins, Varicose Veins, Vascular Health

6 Things You Need to Know About Spider Veins

There are actually many misconceptions about varicose and spider veins. Here are some of the most common: Screen Shot 2015-12-11 at 4.00.50 PM

1. Crossing your legs doesn’t cause varicose veins. Neither does wearing high heels. The pooling of blood is actually more commonly caused by prolonged standing and/or sitting. Other notable causes: obesity, smoking, lack of exercise and hormonal birth control.

2. They’re not just a cosmetic problem. Probably the most common misconception about varicose veins is that people only get them treated because they’re, well, vain. Though experts agree that varicose veins are most often not a health issue, they shouldn’t be ignored. Varicose veins cause fatigue of the legs, swelling and general discomfort. They can also be a warning of  long term health risks including: deep vein thrombosis, blood clots, poor circulation and leg swelling,.

3. It’s definitely genetic, but don’t be too quick to blame one parent or the other. You can inherit the tendencies from either, or both sides of the family, and it can even skip a generation.

4. Varicose veins and spider veins aren’t the same thing.

Spider veins are:

  • small, thin blue blood vessels that can be seen under the skin
  • usually harmless
  • can be a symptom of poor circulation and varicose vein formation

Varicose veins are:

  • stretched-out veins where blood has pooled
  • thick, “ropey” and protrude out of legs
  • occur when one-way valves don’t work properly

5. There’s no proven way to reduce the appearance (aside from professional treatment), though some patients use makeup to cover up their prominent veins. But you can ease the painful symptoms. One temporary solution: Compression stockings or pantyhose

6. Treatment is better than ever, so that’s good news is that treatment today is quite advanced. There are no scars, no cutting—very minimal recovery.  And it is all offered at Reno Vein Clinic.

Call us at 775-329-3100 to schedule a consultation. Our procedures are done in an office setting,  away from the hospital and with no need  for general anesthesia.

 

Article adapted via 

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Filed under Spider Veins, Treatment Options, Varicose Veins

The Difference Between Varicose and Spider Veins

Is it a varicose vein or a spider vein? We get these questions often, as sometimes both of the conditions get confused for one another.

Here’s a simple way to tell:

Spider Veins:

Spider veins are generally tiny blood vessels just below the skin’s surface that become dilated; because they’re so close to the surface of the skin, they can be seen easily.  Clusters of spider veins may appear to be a bruise.  Spider veins can form due to heredity, injury, pregnancy, or hormonal changes.  These veins are not usually harmful, but in rare cases they can bleed and lead to more serious conditions.

Varicose Veins:

Varicose veins are more painful and more noticeable.  If varicose veins are close enough to the surface of the skin, they appear ropey, gnarled, and reddish or purple.  Varicose veins can lead to more serious issues such as blood clots, and can signal a higher risk of other circulatory problems.

Varicose-and-spider

Luckily, with either of these conditions, there are ways to diminish and eliminate problematic veins. Reno Vein Clinic offers the most advanced, minimally invasive vein procedures. If you suffer from varicose or spider veins, contact Dr. Robert Merchant or Dr. John Daake to determine the best treatment for you! (775) 239-3100 www.renoveinclinic.com

 

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Mornings On Fox Segment: Varicose veins and your health

Dr. Robert Merchant, Vascular Surgeon at the Reno Vein Clinic, stopped by Mornings on Fox 11 to talk  about how problematic veins can be.

Varicose veins can be extremely painful and detrimental to a person’s overall health, but Dr. Merchant let us in on which new treatments are out there that can really help improve your health.

WATCH this clip to learn more

Screen Shot 2015-09-15 at 4.59.38 PM

http://www.foxreno.com/news/features/mornings-on-fox-11/stories/varicose-veins-your-health-2488.shtml#.VfhxcmTBwXA

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Filed under Varicose Veins, Vascular Health

The Grandma Disease that Strikes Young Men

We found this informative article from Mens Health.com and think it touches on some important aspects of vein health… especially for men. 

 

If you’re like most guys, you figure that varicose veins are:

a) a woman’s problem
b) a punch line that includes “compression hose”

c) not a big deal.

Think again.

As many as 56 percent of men suffer from these ballooned veins, according to British research.

And varicose veins are not just a cosmetic concern—they can lead to discoloration, bleeding, skin ulcers, and a “heavy leg” sensation that may hinder daily activity.

The problem involves the veins in the lower extremities. When you are in an erect position, your blood pools in these veins, expanding the vein walls which over time stop returning to their previous, more taut condition. According to French researchers, people with a particular genetic variation have markedly weaker veins, and have almost twice the risk for developing varicose veins.

“When the walls are weaker, it allows the veins to expand and eventually the valves [that regulate blood flow in the vein] don’t meet, which allows blood to reflux and flow in the opposite direction,” says Lowell Kabnick, M.D., director of the New York University Vein Center.

When that happens, the person develops the bulged, gnarly look of varicose veins—causing symptoms that include throbbing, swelling, and decreased mobility.

How can you avoid varicose veins. Take these precautions:

  • Exercise: This is the easiest way to maintain healthy venous structure and keep your vein walls strong. It’s important to involve your calves, which play a crucial role in maintaining blood flow from your legs back to the heart.
  • Reduce standing or sitting pressure: Sitting, which has been catching a lot of blame lately, takes another hit here. Why? Blood naturally pools in your legs when you’re not moving, and sitting for long periods exaggerates the problem. Your solution: simply tap a foot, raise your legs, or take a walk. If you’re standing still, sway from side to side if possible. Beyond that, try to raise your legs or lie horizontally twice a day for 15 minutes to remove all pressure on your veins.
  • Compression hose: Dr. Kabnick recommends everyone wear knee-length compression stockings—even if they don’t have signs of varicose veins. Compression leggings’ tension pushes the blood up from the ankle (the greatest pressure point), and redistributes it more evenly up the leg. If you don’t need prescription-grade strength, aim for hose with 10 to 30 millimeters of mercury (measurement of pressure).
  • Watch your diet: Stay away from foods high in sodium (especially restaurant, frozen, and packaged foods) since salt leads to fluid retention.

So, say you already have pain from raised bluish/brown veins. The good news is treatment of varicose veins has come a long way from the medieval-sounding “stripping” procedures of the not-so-distant past.

Today, doctors use lasers to remove and seal shut varicose veins. It’s a quick, noninvasive, outpatient surgery—and pain-free, too. For minor cases, a doctor might suggest sclerotherapy, a chemical injection that destroys the damaged vein.

“Going to the dentist is worse than removing varicose veins,” says Ronald Sprofera, of Jersey City, N.J. His surgery, performed by Dr. Kabnick, was over in 30 minutes. He never so much as flinched.

“I waited 10 years before I did anything,” said Sprofera, who had seen his mother suffer with varicose veins and the ensuing treatment years ago. “I shouldn’t have waited so long.”

 

Article via

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Vein Reflux

Vein reflux, also known as venous reflux disease and venous insufficiency, causes blood flow problems in the legs and affects almost 25 million Americans.

The heart pumps blood to the rest of the body and tiny valves act as one-way gates to keep it from flowing backward to the heart. When these valves leak, fail or no longer function, the blood is able to flow backward and this backward flow allows it to pool up in the legs. This pooling in the legs creates large, swollen veins known as varicose veins.

If untreated, vein reflux disease can also cause pain, severe swelling, skin changes, skin ulcers and tissue breakdown.

If you experience any of these symptoms or would like a vascular health check-up, contact the doctors at Reno Vein Clinic at (775) 329-3100 to set up a free consultation or visit www.renoveinclinic.com for more information.

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Filed under Vascular Health

Spring! The perfect time to start exercising!

As the springtime weather makes it’s way to our area, many are encouraged to take their activities outside. Staying active and exercising is a great way to promote vascular health and prevent painful varicose and spider veins. Physical activity also provides a myriad of other physiological and psychological benefits.

 

According to the American Heart Association and American College of Sports Medicine, 30 minutes of daily physical activity is recommended to reduce both vascular and cardiovascular risk.  Recent research has also indicated that in order to maintain good health, we need to combine both aerobic activity along with strength and flexibility workouts.

 

Here are some examples of good workouts that have aerobic, strength and flexibility components.

 

Hiking

 

Hiking is great way to not only make the most of beautiful scenery, but increase the heart rate along with resistance as well.  If you are new to hiking, start with an easy to moderate trail that’s flat and averages around 1.5 to 3 miles, as you become more comfortable with the terrain and workout you can increase your distance and difficulty.

 

Yoga

 

The health benefits of yoga come both in physiological and psychological forms. Increasing flexibility can also increase circulation, which can help prevent the deterioration of veins. Yoga also helps relieve stress, which is always an additional benefit.

 

Swimming:

 

Swimming lessens the effect of gravity while still keeping the legs active, a big benefit for those who suffer from or are trying to prevent varicose veins. If you are new to swimming, treading water is a great way to begin to increase the heart rate and tone your arms and legs. If treading water is too difficult to begin with, simply walking along a pool floor or using a kickboard to move in the water.

 

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Filed under Spider Veins, Treatment Options, Vascular Health